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An urban-generated wicked problem

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Source: theoceancleanup.com

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch (GPGP) is now 3 times the size of France. In other words, nearly as big as the entire land mass of Queensland.

The GPGP is a result of a convergence of 4 main currents in the Pacific Ocean spanning from the West Coast of North America through to Japan. The GPGP is actually formed by two; initially separate, Western Garbage Patch near the coastline of Japan and the Eastern Garbage Patch which is situated between Hawaii and California.

With over 80% of plastic entering our oceans coming from land-based sources, Stormwater Shepherds advocate for a holistic approach to end the plastocene. This can be achieve by a combination of preventative education, direct cleaning efforts and policy development in plastics and stormwater maintenance.



Will you join us as a zero pollution ambassador?


THE HARD FACTS

toc-gpgp-3xfrance

Source: theoceancleanup.com

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch (GPGP) is now 3 times the size of France. In other words, nearly as big as the entire land mass of Queensland.

The GPGP is a result of a convergence of 4 main currents in the Pacific Ocean spanning from the West Coast of North America through to Japan. The GPGP is actually formed by two; initially separate, Western Garbage Patch near the coastline of Japan and the Eastern Garbage Patch which is situated between Hawaii and California.

With over 80% of plastic entering our oceans coming from land-based sources, Stormwater Shepherds advocate for a holistic approach to end the plastocene. This can be achieve by a combination of preventative education, direct cleaning efforts and policy development in plastics and stormwater maintenance.




Current State


Did you know that our CSIRO research states that 1,500kg of plastic waste is entering Australian oceans every hour?

Did you know that CSIRO research has shown that approximately three-quarters of the rubbish along the Australian coast is plastic? Most is from Australian sources, not from overseas, with debris concentrated near urban centeres. In coastal and offshore waters, most floating debris is plastic. The density of plastic ranges from a few thousand pieces of plastic per square kilometre to more than 40,000 pieces of plastic per square kilometre.

Debris is more highly concentrated around major cities, suggesting local sources. Human deposition is the most important factor in determining how much debris can be found at a site. Water flow (e.g. storm water) and wind contribute to the transport of debris towards marine ecosystems.

The Problem

Did you know that your stormwater network is the unfortunate conveyance & storage network for plastic and organic pollution, which is decreasing water quality and infrastructure lifecycle, and therefore increasing maintenance costs?

Did you know that Stormwater infrastructure provides a doorway of opportunity to stop the flow of plastic pollution to our waterways and oceans?

Would you sacrifice one coffee [$5] a month...

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